Saphir-whorf thesis objectification

Sapir excludes from language all involuntary articulations of humans, for example interjections, as well as of animals because each speech element that is regarded as such, symbolizes a concept. It takes reference to a further experience and is always significant. These elements of speech, concepts, must be associated with whole groups of experiences which are simplified and generalized before a symbolic inventory for communication can be made up. Therefore, "differences in languages are merely differences in modes of expressing a common range of experiences, rather than corresponding to differences in the experiences themselves" (Sapir, 1921: 218). A particular meaning has been attached to a particular speech symbol, to a sound. If it is then “accepted by the speech community as an identity” (Sapir, 1921: 13) communication becomes possible. Language becomes the only way to perception of our environment and consists of an "arbitrary system of symbolism" (Sapir, 1921: 7). Through the simplification of personal experiences into an objectified reality language makes incommunicable experiences communicable and therefore links its speakers together. So thinking and perceptions is shaped and expressed by language. This leads to the assumptions that it determines our consciousness and perception of events and objects (Henslin, 2004: 42). Without language reality cannot be adjusted to. It is "a guide to 'social reality' ", which "powerfully conditions all our thinking about social problems and processes" (Sapir, 1929: 162).

Saphir-whorf thesis objectification

saphir-whorf thesis objectification

Media: